Amira Software system requirements

Amira Software runs on:

  • Microsoft Windows® 10 (64-bit). Testing on Windows® versions older than Windows® 10 has been discontinued.
  • Linux® x86_64 (64-bit). Supported 64-bit architecture is Intel64/AMD64 architecture. Supported Linux distribution is CentOS 7.

Note: For the next release 2022.2, CentOS7 will be discontinued and replaced by Ubuntu 20.04 as officially supported linux platform. There will be no new product development nor update on CentOS7 after this version. You can still use the CentOS7 versions of our Software Products and we will continue to provide bug fixes for 12 months.

Some of the Editions and Extensions or functionalities are limited to some platforms:

  • Amira Software XWind Extension: The Meshing Workroom and Generate Tetra Mesh module are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux.
  • Amira Software XObjectTracking Extension is supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux.

     

  • Olympus and TXM file formats are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux.
  • Deep Learning PredictionDL Training - Segmentation 2D and DL Training - Segmentation 3D modules are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux. A NVIDIA GPU supporting at least CUDA Compute Capability 3.5 is also required for 2D, and 5.2 for 3D. Drivers should be up to date. Compatible GPUs are listed here. A CPU which supports the AVX2 extensions is also required. Due to potential library conflicts between the Deep Learning modules and the Calculus MATLAB module or the Generate Tracks module , it is not possible to instanciate these modules in the same time.

     

Prioritizing hardware for Amira Software

Introduction

This document is intended to give recommendations about choosing a suitable workstation to run Amira.

The four most important components that need to be considered are the graphics card (GPU), the CPU, the RAM and the hard drive.

The performance of direct volume rendering of large volumetric data or large triangulated surface visualization extracted from the data depends heavily on the GPU capability. The performance of image processing algorithms depends heavily on the performance of the CPU. The ability to quickly load or save large data depends heavily on the hard drive performance. And, of course, the amount of available memory in the system will be the main limitation on the size of the data that can be loaded and processed.

Because the hardware requirements will widely vary according to the size of your data and your workflow, we strongly suggest that you take advantage of our supported evaluation version to try working with one of your typical data sets.

In this document, the term Amira refers to Amira Software and all Amira Software extensions.

Graphics Cards

The single most important determinant of Amira performance for visualization is the graphics card.

Amira should run on any graphics system (this includes GPU and its driver) that provides a complete implementation of OpenGL 2.1 or higher (certain features may not be available depending on the OpenGL version and extensions supported). However, graphics board and driver bugs are not unusual.

The amount of GPU memory needed depends on the size of the data. We recommend a minimum of 1 GB on the card. Some visualization modules may require having graphics memory large enough to hold the actual data.

High-end graphics cards have 16 to 32 GB of memory. Optimal performance volumetric visualization at full resolution requires that data fit in graphics memory (some volume rendering modules of Amira are able to go around this limitation).

Amira will not benefit from multiple graphics boards for the purpose of visualization on a single monitor. However, some of the image processing algorithms rely on CUDA for computation, and while the computation can run on the single CUDA-enabled graphics board, this computation can also run on a second CUDA-enabled graphics card installed on the system. A multiple graphics board configuration can be useful to drive many screens or in immersive environments.

When comparing graphics boards, there are many different criteria and performance numbers to consider. Some are more important than others, and some are more important for certain kinds of rendering. Thus, it's important to consider your specific visualization requirements. Integrated graphics boards are not recommended for graphics-intensive applications such as Amira except for basic visualization.

Wikipedia articles on NVIDIA GeForce/Quadro and AMD Radeon/FirePro cards will detail specific performance metrics:

  • Memory size: This is very important for volume visualization (both volume rendering and slices) to maximize image quality and performance because volume data is stored in the GPU's texture memory for rendering. It is also important for geometry rendering if the geometry is very large (large number of triangles).
  • Memory interface / Bandwidth: This is important for volume rendering because large amounts of texture data need to be moved from the system to the GPU during rendering. The PCI Express 3 buses are the fastest interfaces available today.
  • Number of cores (also known as stream processors): This is very important for volume rendering because every high-quality rendering feature you enable requires additional code to be executed on the GPU during rendering.
  • Triangles per second: This is very important for geometry rendering (surfaces, meshes).
  • Texels per second / Fill rate: This is very important for volume visualization (especially for volume rendering), because a large number of textures will be rendered and pixels will be "filled" multiple times to blend the final image.

     

Professional graphics boards

VendorFamilySeries
NVIDIAQuadroMaxwell, Kepler, Pascal, RTX, Turing
AMDFireProW, V

All driver bugs are submitted to the vendors. A fix may be expected in a future driver release.

Standard graphics boards

VendorFamilySeries
NVIDIAGeForceMaxwell, Kepler, Pascal, RTX, Turing
AMDRadeonsince GCN 1.1
IntelHD GraphicsBroadwell, Skylake

Due to vendor support policies, on standard graphics boards we are not able to commit to providing a fix for bugs caused by the driver.

  • professional graphics boards will benefit from the professional support offered by the vendors (driver bug fixes).
  • Always use a recent driver version for your graphics board.
  • You should also ensure that your monitor is plugged to the graphic card instead of the integrated chipset.
  • With an NVIDIA Quadro board we recommend to use the driver profile "3D App - Visual Simulation". In case of rendering or performance issues you may want to experiment with different "3D App" profiles.
  • Turning off the Vertical sync feature improves frame rate.
  • Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nvidia_graphics_processing_units for a complete list of NVIDIA boards and comparisons.
  • Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_AMD_graphics_processing_units for a complete list of AMD boards and comparisons.
  • Some visualization modules like Volume Rendering may not support Intel graphic cards.

     

System Memory

System memory is the second most important determinant for Amira users who need to process large data.

You may need much more memory than the actual size of the data you want to load within Amira. Some processing may require several times the memory required by the original data set. If you want to load, for instance, a 4 GB data set in memory and apply a non-local means filter to the original data and then compute a distance map, you may need up to 16 or 20 GB of additional memory for the intermediate results of your processing. Commonly you need 2 or 3 times the memory footprint of the data being processed for basic operations. For more complex workflows you may need up to 6 or 8 times amount of memory, so 32 GB may be required for a 4 GB dataset.

Also notice that size of the data on disk may be much smaller than memory needed to load the data as the file format may have compressed the data (for instance, loading a stack of JPEG files).

Amira can handle data that exceed your system's physical memory using Large Data Access (LDA) or Smart Multichannel Series (SMS) technologies - SMS requires Xplore5D extension. They are excellent ways to stretch the performance, but it is not a direct substitute for having more physical memory. The best performance and optimal resolution is achieved by using Amira large data technologies in combination with a large amount of system memory.

Amira 3D Pro provides another loading option to support for 2D and 3D image processing from disk to disk, without requiring loading the entire data into memory; modules then operate per data slab. This enables processing and quantification of large image data even with limited hardware memory. Since processing of each slab requires loading data and saving results from/to the hard drive, it dramatically increases processing time. Thus, processing data fully loaded in memory is always preferred for best performance.

Hard Drives

When working with large files, reading data from the disk can slow down your productivity. A standard hard drive (HDD) (e.g., 7200rpm SATA disk) can only stream data to your application at a sustained rate of about 60 MB/second. That is the theoretical limit; your actual experience is likely to be closer to 40 MB/second. When you want to read a 1 GB file from the disk, you likely have to wait 25 seconds. For a 10 GB file, the wait is 250 seconds, over 4 minutes. Large data technologies will greatly reduce wait time for data visualization, but disk access will still be a limiting factor when you want to read data files at full resolution for data processing. Compared to traditional HDDs, solid state drives (SSD) can improve read and write speeds.

For best performance, the recommended solution is to configure multiple hard drives (3 or more HDD or SSD) in RAID5 mode; note that RAID configurations may require substantially more system administration. For performance only, RAID 0 could be used, but be warned of risk of data loss upon hard-drive failure. If you want performance and data redundancy then RAID 5 is recommended.

Reading data across the network, for example from a file server, will normally be much slower than reading from a local disk. The performance of your network depends on the network technology (100 Mb, 1 Gb, etc.), the amount of other traffic on the network, and number/size of other requests to the file server. Remember, you are (usually) sharing the network and server and will not get the theoretical bandwidth. Large data technologies may also facilitate visualization of volume data through the network, but if data loading is a bottleneck for your workflow, we recommend making a local copy of your data.

CPU

While Amira mostly relies on GPU performance for visualization, many modules are computational intensive and their performance will be strongly affected by CPU performance.

More and more modules inside Amira are multi-threaded and thus can take advantage of multiple CPUs or multiple CPU cores available on your system. This is the case for most of the quantification modules provided with Amira XImagePAQ and also various computation modules.

Fast CPU clock, number of cores, and memory cache are the three most important factors affecting Amira performance. While most multi-threaded modules will scale up nicely according to the number of cores, the scaling bottleneck may come from memory access. From experience, up to 8 cores show almost linear scalability while more than 8 cores do not show much gain in performance. A larger memory cache improves performance.

How hardware can help optimizing

Here is a summary of hardware characteristics to consider for optimizing particular tasks.

Visualizing large data (LDA or SMS):

  • Fast hard drive
  • System memory
  • GPU Memory
  • Memory to GPU/CPU bandwidth

Basic volume rendering:

  • GPU fill rate (texels per second)

Advanced volume rendering (Volume Rendering module):

  • Heavy use of pixel shaders
  • GPU clock frequency, number of GPU cores

Large geometry rendering such as large surfaces from Isosurface or Generate Surface, large point clusters, large numerical simulation meshes:

  • GPU clock frequency, number of triangles per second

Image processing and quantification (Amira 3D Pro):

  • Multiple CPU cores (for many modules, including most image processing modules)
  • CPU clock frequency

Anisotropic Diffusion, Non-Local Means Filter (high-performance smoothing and noise reduction image filters):

  • GPU speed, number of GPU cores (stream processors), CUDA-compatible (NVIDIA)

Other compute modules, display module data extraction:

  • CPU clock frequency
  • Multiple CPU cores (for a number of multi-threaded modules, such as Generate Surface, Register Images, Resample, Arithmetic)

GPU computing using custom module programmed using Amira XPand C++ API and GPU API:

  • GPU clock frequency, number of GPU cores (stream processors)
  • Multi-GPU systems such as NVIDIA Tesla
  • CUDA support

Special considerations

Environment variables

QT_PLUGIN_PATH must not be exported as a system-wide environment variable because it can interfere with this application.

Firewall

An internet access is necessary to activate Amira. Your firewall may prevent the connection to the license server.

Linux

Amira is only available for Intel64/AMD64 systems.

The official Linux distribution for Amira is CentOS 7 64-bit. Nevertheless, Amira is likely to work on some other 64-bit Linux distributions if the required version of system libraries can be found, but technical support of those platforms will be limited. Here is a non-exhaustive list of these 64-bit Linux distributions:

  • CentOS® 7, the official Linux distribution on which Amira has been fully tested.
  • Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® 7.x.

Notes:

  • After a standard installation of Linux, hardware acceleration is not necessarily activated, although X-Windows and Amira may work fine. To enable OpenGL hardware, acceleration specific drivers may have to be installed. This can drastically increase rendering performance. Sometimes it is necessary to disable the stencil buffers (by starting Amira with the option -no_stencils) to get acceleration.
  • On some distributions, some parts of the user interface, the segmentation editor for example, may not display correctly. This is a known Qt issue. You can work around this by disabling the composite option in the extension section of your Xorg.conf configuration file:

    Section "Extensions"
    Option "Composite" "disable"
    EndSection

  • To work properly on Linux systems where SELinux is enabled, Amira requires the modification of the security context of some Amira shared object files so they can be relocated in memory. The user (maybe root) that installs Amira has to run the following command from a shell console in order to set the right security context:
    chcon -v -t texrel_shlib_t "${AMIRA_ROOT}"/lib/arch-Linux*-*/lib*.so
  • Even if Amira should work with any desktop (like KDE), it has been validated only with GNOME.
  • Since the switch to Qt 5.9 and for CentOS < 7.7 (cat /etc/centos-release to check the version), you need to update the freetype library of your system as follow:
    • Log as root
    • sudo yum update freetype
  •  

XPand C++ API

To create custom extensions for Amira with the C++ API available in Amira 3D Pro on Windows, you will need Microsoft Visual Studio® 2013, Update 4. It is important to install Visual Studio prior to run Amira in debug mode.

To create custom extensions for Amira with the C++ API available in Amira 3D Pro on Linux, you will need gcc 4.8.x on RHEL 7. Use the following command to determine the version of the GNU compiler:
gcc --version

Notes:

  • The specific compiler version to use depends on Amira's application version on which you want to run the extension. In order to obtain the required compiler version, launch your target version of Amira and type app uname in the TCL console.
  • For the next 2022.2 release, the compilers' versions required to use the XPand extension will be upgraded to:
    • Microsoft Visual Studio® 2019 on Windows
    • gcc 9 on Linux

MATLAB

Currently supported version of MATLAB on all platforms is 2020a. To use the Calculus MATLAB module that establishes a connection to MATLAB (MathWorks, Inc.), follow these installation instructions:

Windows

If you did not register during installation, enter the following command on the Windows command line: matlab /regserver.

In addition, add MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin and MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin/win64 in your PATH environment variable to allow Amira to find MATLAB libraries.

Linux

The LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable should be set to MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin/glnxa64 on Linux 64-bit.

The PATH environment variable should be also set to MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin.
If you still have trouble starting Calculus MATLAB after setting the environment variable, it might be because the GNU Standard C++ Library (libstdc++) installed on your platform is older than the one required by MATLAB. You can check MATLAB's embedded libstdc++ version in MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/sys/os/glnxa64 on Linux 64-bit.

If needed, add this path to LD_LIBRARY_PATH.

Dell Backup and Recovery Application

We have detected some incompatibility issues with former versions ( 1.9) of Dell Backup and Recovery Application which can make Amira crash when opening files with the file dialog. Please update your Dell Backup and Recovery Application to 1.9.2.8 or higher if you encounter this issue.

Remote display

Amira is not tested in remote sessions; remote display is not supported.

Avizo Software system requirements

Avizo Software runs on:

  • Microsoft Windows® 10 (64-bit). Testing on Windows® versions older than Windows® 10 has been discontinued.
  • Linux® x86_64 (64-bit). Supported 64-bit architecture is Intel64/AMD64 architecture. Supported Linux distribution is CentOS 7.

Note: For the next release 2022.2, CentOS7 will be discontinued and replaced by Ubuntu 20.04 as officially supported linux platform. There will be no new product development nor update on CentOS7 after this version. You can still use the CentOS7 versions of our Software Products and we will continue to provide bug fixes for 12 months.

Some of the Editions and Extensions or functionalities are limited to some platforms:

  • Avizo Software XWind Extension: The Meshing Workroom and Generate Tetra Mesh module are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux.
  • Avizo Software XReadIGES Extension, Avizo Software XReadSTEP Extension are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux,
  • Avizo Software XLabSuite Extension: molecular diffusivity, formation factor and thermal conductivity computation are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux.
  • Avizo Software XMetrology Extension is supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux.

     

  • Olympus and TXM file formats are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux.
  • Deep Learning PredictionDL Training - Segmentation 2D and DL Training - Segmentation 3D modules are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux. A NVIDIA GPU supporting at least CUDA Compute Capability 3.5 is also required for 2D, and 5.2 for 3D. Drivers should be up to date. Compatible GPUs are listed here. A CPU which supports the AVX2 extensions is also required. Due to potential library conflicts between the Deep Learning modules and the Calculus MATLAB module or the Generate Tracks module , it is not possible to instanciate these modules in the same time.

     

Prioritizing hardware for Avizo Software

This document is intended to give recommendations about choosing a suitable workstation to run Avizo Software.

The four most important components that need to be considered are the graphics card (GPU), the CPU, the RAM and the hard drive.

The performance of direct volume rendering of large volumetric data or large triangulated surface visualization extracted from the data depends heavily on the GPU capability. The performance of image processing algorithms depends heavily on the performance of the CPU. The ability to quickly load or save large data depends heavily on the hard drive performance. And, of course, the amount of available memory in the system will be the main limitation on the size of the data that can be loaded and processed.

Because the hardware requirements will widely vary according to the size of your data and your workflow, we strongly suggest that you take advantage of our supported evaluation version to try working with one of your typical data sets.

In this document, the term Avizo refers to all Avizo Software editions and all Avizo Software extensions.

Graphics Cards

The single most important determinant of Avizo performance for visualization is the graphics card.

Avizo should run on any graphics system (this includes GPU and its driver) that provides a complete implementation of OpenGL 2.1 or higher (certain features may not be available depending on the OpenGL version and extensions supported). However, graphics board and driver bugs are not unusual.

The amount of GPU memory needed depends on the size of the data. We recommend a minimum of 1 GB on the card. Some visualization modules may require having graphics memory large enough to hold the actual data.

High-end graphics cards have 16 to 32 GB of memory. Optimal performance volumetric visualization at full resolution requires that data fit in graphics memory (some volume rendering modules of Avizo are able to go around this limitation).

Avizo will not benefit from multiple graphics boards for the purpose of visualization on a single monitor. However, some of the image processing algorithms rely on CUDA for computation, and while the computation can run on the single CUDA-enabled graphics board, this computation can also run on a second CUDA-enabled graphics card installed on the system. A multiple graphics board configuration can be useful to drive many screens or in immersive environments.

When comparing graphics boards, there are many different criteria and performance numbers to consider. Some are more important than others, and some are more important for certain kinds of rendering. Thus, it's important to consider your specific visualization requirements. Integrated graphics boards are not recommended for graphics-intensive applications such as Avizo except for basic visualization.

Wikipedia articles on NVIDIA GeForce/Quadro and AMD Radeon/FirePro cards will detail specific performance metrics:

  • Memory size: This is very important for volume visualization (both volume rendering and slices) to maximize image quality and performance because volume data is stored in the GPU's texture memory for rendering. It is also important for geometry rendering if the geometry is very large (large number of triangles).
  • Memory interface / Bandwidth: This is important for volume rendering because large amounts of texture data need to be moved from the system to the GPU during rendering. The PCI Express 3 buses are the fastest interfaces available today.
  • Number of cores (also known as stream processors): This is very important for volume rendering because every high-quality rendering feature you enable requires additional code to be executed on the GPU during rendering.
  • Triangles per second: This is very important for geometry rendering (surfaces, meshes).
  • Texels per second / Fill rate: This is very important for volume visualization (especially for volume rendering), because a large number of textures will be rendered and pixels will be "filled" multiple times to blend the final image.

     

Professional graphics boards

VendorFamilySeries
NVIDIAQuadroMaxwell, Kepler, Pascal, RTX, Turing
AMDFireProW, V

All driver bugs are submitted to the vendors. A fix may be expected in a future driver release.

Standard graphics boards

VendorFamilySeries
NVIDIAGeForceMaxwell, Kepler, Pascal, RTX, Turing
AMDRadeonsince GCN 1.1
IntelHD GraphicsBroadwell, Skylake

Due to vendor support policies, on standard graphics boards we are not able to commit to providing a fix for bugs caused by the driver.

  • professional graphics boards will benefit from the professional support offered by the vendors (driver bug fixes).
  • Always use a recent driver version for your graphics board.
  • You should also ensure that your monitor is plugged to the graphic card instead of the integrated chipset.
  • With an NVIDIA Quadro board we recommend to use the driver profile "3D App - Visual Simulation". In case of rendering or performance issues you may want to experiment with different "3D App" profiles.
  • Turning off the Vertical sync feature improves frame rate.
  • Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nvidia_graphics_processing_units for a complete list of NVIDIA boards and comparisons.
  • Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_AMD_graphics_processing_units for a complete list of AMD boards and comparisons.
  • Some visualization modules like Volume Rendering may not support Intel graphic cards.

     

System Memory

System memory is the second most important determinant for Avizo users who need to process large data.

You may need much more memory than the actual size of the data you want to load within Avizo. Some processing may require several times the memory required by the original data set. If you want to load, for instance, a 4 GB data set in memory and apply a non-local means filter to the original data and then compute a distance map, you may need up to 16 or 20 GB of additional memory for the intermediate results of your processing. Commonly you need 2 or 3 times the memory footprint of the data being processed for basic operations. For more complex workflows you may need up to 6 or 8 times amount of memory, so 32 GB may be required for a 4 GB dataset.

Also notice that size of the data on disk may be much smaller than memory needed to load the data as the file format may have compressed the data (for instance, loading a stack of JPEG files).

Avizo can handle data that exceed your system's physical memory using Large Data Access (LDA) or Smart Multichannel Series (SMS) technologies - SMS requires Xplore5D extension. They are excellent ways to stretch the performance, but it is not a direct substitute for having more physical memory. The best performance and optimal resolution is achieved by using Avizo large data technologies in combination with a large amount of system memory.

Avizo 3D Pro provides another loading option to support for 2D and 3D image processing from disk to disk, without requiring loading the entire data into memory; modules then operate per data slab. This enables processing and quantification of large image data even with limited hardware memory. Since processing of each slab requires loading data and saving results from/to the hard drive, it dramatically increases processing time. Thus, processing data fully loaded in memory is always preferred for best performance.

Hard Drives

When working with large files, reading data from the disk can slow down your productivity. A standard hard drive (HDD) (e.g., 7200rpm SATA disk) can only stream data to your application at a sustained rate of about 60 MB/second. That is the theoretical limit; your actual experience is likely to be closer to 40 MB/second. When you want to read a 1 GB file from the disk, you likely have to wait 25 seconds. For a 10 GB file, the wait is 250 seconds, over 4 minutes. Large data technologies will greatly reduce wait time for data visualization, but disk access will still be a limiting factor when you want to read data files at full resolution for data processing. Compared to traditional HDDs, solid state drives (SSD) can improve read and write speeds.

For best performance, the recommended solution is to configure multiple hard drives (3 or more HDD or SSD) in RAID5 mode; note that RAID configurations may require substantially more system administration. For performance only, RAID 0 could be used, but be warned of risk of data loss upon hard-drive failure. If you want performance and data redundancy then RAID 5 is recommended.

Reading data across the network, for example from a file server, will normally be much slower than reading from a local disk. The performance of your network depends on the network technology (100 Mb, 1 Gb, etc.), the amount of other traffic on the network, and number/size of other requests to the file server. Remember, you are (usually) sharing the network and server and will not get the theoretical bandwidth. Large data technologies may also facilitate visualization of volume data through the network, but if data loading is a bottleneck for your workflow, we recommend making a local copy of your data.

CPU

While Avizo mostly relies on GPU performance for visualization, many modules are computational intensive and their performance will be strongly affected by CPU performance.

More and more modules inside Avizo are multi-threaded and thus can take advantage of multiple CPUs or multiple CPU cores available on your system. This is the case for most of the quantification modules provided with Avizo a number of modules of the Avizo XLabSuite Extension, and also various computation modules.

Fast CPU clock, number of cores, and memory cache are the three most important factors affecting Avizo performance. While most multi-threaded modules will scale up nicely according to the number of cores, the scaling bottleneck may come from memory access. From experience, up to 8 cores show almost linear scalability while more than 8 cores do not show much gain in performance. A larger memory cache improves performance.

How hardware can help optimizing

Here is a summary of hardware characteristics to consider for optimizing particular tasks.

Visualizing large data (LDA or SMS):

  • Fast hard drive
  • System memory
  • GPU Memory
  • Memory to GPU/CPU bandwidth

Basic volume rendering:

  • GPU fill rate (texels per second)

Advanced volume rendering (Volume Rendering module):

  • Heavy use of pixel shaders
  • GPU clock frequency, number of GPU cores

Large geometry rendering such as large surfaces from Isosurface or Generate Surface, large point clusters, large numerical simulation meshes:

  • GPU clock frequency, number of triangles per second

Image processing and quantification (Avizo 3D Pro):

  • Multiple CPU cores (for many modules, including most image processing modules)
  • CPU clock frequency

Anisotropic Diffusion, Non-Local Means Filter (high-performance smoothing and noise reduction image filters), Avizo XLabSuite Extension (absolute permeability computation):

  • GPU speed, number of GPU cores (stream processors), CUDA-compatible (NVIDIA)

Other compute modules, display module data extraction:

  • CPU clock frequency
  • Multiple CPU cores (for a number of multi-threaded modules, such as Generate Surface, Register Images, Resample, Arithmetic)

GPU computing using custom module programmed using Avizo XPand C++ API and GPU API:

  • GPU clock frequency, number of GPU cores (stream processors)
  • Multi-GPU systems such as NVIDIA Tesla
  • CUDA support

Special considerations

Environment variables

QT_PLUGIN_PATH must not be exported as a system-wide environment variable because it can interfere with this application.

Firewall

An internet access is necessary to activate Avizo. Your firewall may prevent the connection to the license server.

Linux

Avizo is only available for Intel64/AMD64 systems.

The official Linux distribution for Avizo is CentOS 7 64-bit. Nevertheless, Avizo is likely to work on some other 64-bit Linux distributions if the required version of system libraries can be found, but technical support of those platforms will be limited. Here is a non-exhaustive list of these 64-bit Linux distributions:

  • CentOS® 7, the official Linux distribution on which Avizo has been fully tested.
  • Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® 7.x.

Notes:

  • After a standard installation of Linux, hardware acceleration is not necessarily activated, although X-Windows and Avizo may work fine. To enable OpenGL hardware, acceleration specific drivers may have to be installed. This can drastically increase rendering performance. Sometimes it is necessary to disable the stencil buffers (by starting Avizo with the option -no_stencils) to get acceleration.
  • On some distributions, some parts of the user interface, the segmentation editor for example, may not display correctly. This is a known Qt issue. You can work around this by disabling the composite option in the extension section of your Xorg.conf configuration file:

    Section "Extensions"
    Option "Composite" "disable"
    EndSection

  • To work properly on Linux systems where SELinux is enabled, Avizo requires the modification of the security context of some Avizo shared object files so they can be relocated in memory. The user (maybe root) that installs Avizo has to run the following command from a shell console in order to set the right security context:
    chcon -v -t texrel_shlib_t "${AVIZO_ROOT}"/lib/arch-Linux*-*/lib*.so
  • Even if Avizo should work with any desktop (like KDE), it has been validated only with GNOME.
  • Since the switch to Qt 5.9 and for CentOS < 7.7 (cat /etc/centos-release to check the version), you need to update the freetype library of your system as follow:
    • Log as root
    • sudo yum update freetype
  •  

XPand C++ API

To create custom extensions for Avizo with the C++ API available in Avizo 3D Pro on Windows, you will need Microsoft Visual Studio® 2013, Update 4. It is important to install Visual Studio prior to run Avizo in debug mode.

To create custom extensions for Avizo with the C++ API available in Avizo 3D Pro on Linux, you will need gcc 4.8.x on RHEL 7. Use the following command to determine the version of the GNU compiler:
gcc --version

Notes:

  • The specific compiler version to use depends on Avizo's application version on which you want to run the extension. In order to obtain the required compiler version, launch your target version of Avizo and type app uname in the TCL console.
  • For the next 2022.2 release, the compilers' versions required to use the XPand extension will be upgraded to:
    • Microsoft Visual Studio® 2019 on Windows
    • gcc 9 on Linux

MATLAB

Currently supported version of MATLAB on all platforms is 2020a. To use the Calculus MATLAB module that establishes a connection to MATLAB (MathWorks, Inc.), follow these installation instructions:

Windows

If you did not register during installation, enter the following command on the Windows command line: matlab /regserver.

In addition, add MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin and MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin/win64 in your PATH environment variable to allow Avizo to find MATLAB libraries.

Linux

The LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable should be set to MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin/glnxa64 on Linux 64-bit.

The PATH environment variable should be also set to MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin.
If you still have trouble starting Calculus MATLAB after setting the environment variable, it might be because the GNU Standard C++ Library (libstdc++) installed on your platform is older than the one required by MATLAB. You can check MATLAB's embedded libstdc++ version in MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/sys/os/glnxa64 on Linux 64-bit.

If needed, add this path to LD_LIBRARY_PATH.

Dell Backup and Recovery Application

We have detected some incompatibility issues with former versions ( 1.9) of Dell Backup and Recovery Application which can make Avizo crash when opening files with the file dialog. Please update your Dell Backup and Recovery Application to 1.9.2.8 or higher if you encounter this issue.

Remote display

Avizo is not tested in remote sessions; remote display is not supported.

PerGeos Software system requirements

PerGeos Software runs on:

  • Microsoft Windows® 10 (64-bit). Testing on Windows® versions older than Windows® 10 has been discontinued.
  • Linux® x86_64 (64-bit). Supported 64-bit architecture is Intel64/AMD64 architecture. Supported Linux distribution is CentOS 7.

Some of the extensions or functionalities are limited to some platforms:

  • PerGeos Software Petrophysics Extension: molecular diffusivity, formation factor and thermal conductivity computation are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux.

     

  • Olympus and TXM file formats are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux.
  • Deep Learning Prediction and DL Training - Segmentation 2D tools are supported only on Microsoft Windows, not on Linux. A NVIDIA GPU supporting CUDA Compute Capability 3.5 or higher is also required, with up-to-date drivers. Compatible GPUs are listed here. A CPU which supports the AVX2 extensions is also required.

Prioritizing hardware for PerGeos Software

This document is intended to give recommendations about choosing a suitable workstation to run PerGeos Software.

The four most important components that need to be considered are the graphics card (GPU), the CPU, the RAM and the hard drive.

The performance of direct volume rendering of large volumetric data or large triangulated surface visualization extracted from the data depends heavily on the GPU capability. The performance of image processing algorithms depends heavily on the performance of the CPU. The ability to quickly load or save large data depends heavily on the hard drive performance. And, of course, the amount of available memory in the system will be the main limitation on the size of the data that can be loaded and processed.

Because the hardware requirements will widely vary according to the size of your data and your workflow, we strongly suggest that you take advantage of our supported evaluation version to try working with one of your typical data sets.

Graphics Cards

The single most important determinant of PerGeos performance for visualization is the graphics card.

PerGeos should run on any graphics system (this includes GPU and its driver) that provides a complete implementation of OpenGL 2.1 or higher (certain features may not be available depending on the OpenGL version and extensions supported). However, graphics board and driver bugs are not unusual.

The amount of GPU memory needed depends on the size of the data. We recommend a minimum of 1 GB on the card. Some visualization modules may require having graphics memory large enough to hold the actual data.

High-end graphics cards have 16 to 32 GB of memory. Optimal performance volumetric visualization at full resolution requires that data fit in graphics memory (some volume rendering modules of PerGeos are able to go around this limitation).

PerGeos will not benefit from multiple graphics boards for the purpose of visualization on a single monitor. However, some of the image processing algorithms rely on CUDA for computation, and while the computation can run on the single CUDA-enabled graphics board, this computation can also run on a second CUDA-enabled graphics card installed on the system. A multiple graphics board configuration can be useful to drive many screens or in immersive environments.

When comparing graphics boards, there are many different criteria and performance numbers to consider. Some are more important than others, and some are more important for certain kinds of rendering. Thus, it's important to consider your specific visualization requirements. Integrated graphics boards are not recommended for graphics-intensive applications such as PerGeos except for basic visualization.

Wikipedia articles on NVIDIA GeForce/Quadro and AMD Radeon/FirePro cards will detail specific performance metrics:

  • Memory size: This is very important for volume visualization (both volume rendering and slices) to maximize image quality and performance because volume data is stored in the GPU's texture memory for rendering. It is also important for geometry rendering if the geometry is very large (large number of triangles).
  • Memory interface / Bandwidth: This is important for volume rendering because large amounts of texture data need to be moved from the system to the GPU during rendering. The PCI Express 3 buses are the fastest interfaces available today.
  • Number of cores (also known as stream processors): This is very important for volume rendering because every high-quality rendering feature you enable requires additional code to be executed on the GPU during rendering.
  • Triangles per second: This is very important for geometry rendering (surfaces, meshes).
  • Texels per second / Fill rate: This is very important for volume visualization (especially for volume rendering), because a large number of textures will be rendered and pixels will be "filled" multiple times to blend the final image.

     

Professional graphics boards

VendorFamilySeries

NVIDIA

QuadroMaxwell, Kepler, Pascal, RTX, Turing
AMDFireProW, V

All driver bugs are submitted to the vendors. A fix may be expected in a future driver release.

Standard graphics boards

VendorFamilySeries

NVIDIA

GeForceMaxwell, Kepler, Pascal, RTX, Turing
AMDRadeonsince GCN 1.1
IntelHD GraphicsBroadwell, Skylake

Due to vendor support policies, on standard graphics boards we are not able to commit to providing a fix for bugs caused by the driver.

  • professional graphics boards will benefit from the professional support offered by the vendors (driver bug fixes).
  • Always use a recent driver version for your graphics board.
  • With an NVIDIA Quadro board we recommend to use the driver profile "3D App - Visual Simulation". In case of rendering or performance issues you may want to experiment with different "3D App" profiles.
  • Turning off the Vertical sync feature improves frame rate.
  • Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nvidia_graphics_processing_units for a complete list of NVIDIA boards and comparisons.
  • Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_AMD_graphics_processing_units for a complete list of AMD boards and comparisons.
  • For the visualization of large 2D images, NVDIA Quadro boards are highly recommended.
  • Some visualization modules like Volume Rendering may not support Intel graphic cards.

     

System Memory

System memory is the second most important determinant for PerGeos users who need to process large data.

You may need much more memory than the actual size of the data you want to load within PerGeos. Some processing may require several times the memory required by the original data set. If you want to load, for instance, a 4 GB data set in memory and apply a non-local means filter to the original data and then compute a distance map, you may need up to 16 or 20 GB of additional memory for the intermediate results of your processing. Commonly you will need 2 or 3 times the memory footprint of the data being processed for basic operations. For more complex workflows you may need up to 6 or 8 times amount of memory, so 32 GB may be required for a 4 GB dataset.

Also notice that size of the data on disk may be much smaller than memory needed to load the data as the file format may have compressed the data (for instance, loading a stack of JPEG files).

PerGeos's Large Data Access (LDA) technology will enable you to work with data sizes exceeding your system's physical memory. LDA is an excellent way to stretch the performance, but it is not a direct substitute for having more physical memory. The best performance and optimal resolution will be achieved by using PerGeos's LDA technology in combination with a large amount of system memory. LDA provides a very convenient way to quickly load and browse your whole dataset. Note that LDA data will not work with most compute modules, which require the full resolution data to be loaded in memory.

PerGeos provides another loading option to support 2D and 3D image processing from disk to disk (``read as external disk data''), without requiring loading the entire data into memory; modules then operate per data slab. This enables processing and quantification of large image data even with limited hardware memory. Since processing of each slab requires loading data and saving results from/to the hard drive, it dramatically increases processing time. Thus, processing data fully loaded in memory is always preferred for best performance.

Hard Drives

When working with large files, reading data from the disk can slow down your productivity. A standard hard drive (HDD) (e.g., 7200rpm SATA disk) can only stream data to your application at a sustained rate of about 60 MB/second. That is the theoretical limit; your actual experience is likely to be closer to 40 MB/second. When you want to read a 1 GB file from the disk, you will likely have to wait 25 seconds. For a 10 GB file, the wait is 250 seconds, over 4 minutes. LDA technology will greatly reduce wait time for data visualization, but disk access will still be a limiting factor when you want to read data files at full resolution for data processing. Compared to traditional HDDs, solid state drives (SSD) can improve read and write speeds.

For best performance, the recommended solution is to configure multiple hard drives (3 or more HDD or SSD) in RAID5 mode; note that RAID configurations may require substantially more system administration. For performance only, RAID 0 could be used, but be warned of risk of data loss upon hard-drive failure. If you want performance and data redundancy then RAID 5 is recommended.

Reading data across the network, for example from a file server, will normally be much slower than reading from a local disk. The performance of your network depends on the network technology (100 Mb, 1 Gb, etc.), the amount of other traffic on the network, and number/size of other requests to the file server. Remember, you are (usually) sharing the network and server and will not get the theoretical bandwidth. LDA technology may also facilitate visualization of volume data through the network, but if data loading is a bottleneck for your workflow, we recommend making a local copy of your data.

CPU

While PerGeos mostly relies on GPU performance for visualization, many modules are computational intensive and their performance will be strongly affected by CPU performance.

More and more modules inside PerGeos are multi-threaded and thus can take advantage of multiple CPUs or multiple CPU cores available on your system. This is the case for most of the quantification modules provided with PerGeos, a number of modules of the Petrophysics Extension and also various computation modules.

Fast CPU clock, number of cores, and memory cache are the three most important factors affecting PerGeos performance. While most multi-threaded modules will scale up nicely according to the number of cores, the scaling bottleneck may come from memory access. From experience, up to 8 cores show almost linear scalability while more than 8 cores do not show much gain in performance. A larger memory cache improves performance.

How hardware can help optimizing

Here is a summary of hardware characteristics to consider for optimizing particular tasks.

Visualizing large data (LDA):

  • Fast hard drive,
  • System memory,
  • GPU Memory,
  • Memory to GPU/CPU bandwidth.

Basic volume rendering:

  • GPU fill rate (texels per second)

Advanced volume rendering (Volume Rendering module):

  • Heavy use of pixel shaders,
  • GPU clock frequency, number of GPU cores.

Large geometry rendering such as large surfaces from Isosurface or Generate Surface, large point clusters, large numerical simulation meshes,...:

  • GPU clock frequency, number of triangles per second.

Image processing and quantification:

  • Multiple CPU cores (for many modules, including most image processing modules),
  • CPU clock frequency.

Anisotropic Diffusion, Non-Local Means Filter (high-performance smoothing and noise reduction image filters) :

  • GPU speed, number of GPU cores (stream processors), CUDA-compatible (NVIDIA).

Other compute modules, display module data extraction:

  • CPU clock frequency,
  • Multiple CPU cores (for a number of multi-threaded modules, such as Generate Surface, Register Images, Resample, Arithmetic).

GPU computing using custom module programmed using PerGeos XPand C++ API and GPU API:

  • GPU clock frequency, number of GPU cores (stream processors),
  • Multi-GPU systems such as NVIDIA Tesla,
  • CUDA support.

Special considerations

Environment variables

QT_PLUGIN_PATH must not be exported as a system-wide environment variable because it can interfere with this application.

Firewall

An internet access is necessary to activate PerGeos. Your firewall may prevent the connection to the license server.

Linux

PerGeos is only available for Intel64/AMD64 systems.

The official Linux distribution for PerGeos is CentOS 7 64-bit. Nevertheless, PerGeos is likely to work on some other 64-bit Linux distributions if the required version of system libraries can be found, but technical support of those platforms will be limited. Here is a non-exhaustive list of these 64-bit Linux distributions:

  • CentOS 7, the official Linux distribution on which PerGeos has been fully tested.
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.x.

Notes:

  • After a standard installation of Linux, hardware acceleration is not necessarily activated, although X-Windows and PerGeos may work fine. To enable OpenGL hardware, acceleration specific drivers may have to be installed. This can drastically increase rendering performance. Sometimes it is necessary to disable the stencil buffers (by starting PerGeos with the option -no_stencils) to get acceleration.
  • On some distributions, some parts of the user interface may not display correctly. This is a known Qt issue. You can work around this by disabling the composite option in the extension section of your Xorg.conf configuration file:

    Section "Extensions"
    Option "Composite" "disable"
    EndSection

  • To work properly on Linux systems where SELinux is enabled, PerGeos requires the modification of the security context of some PerGeos shared object files so they can be relocated in memory. The user (maybe root) that installs PerGeos has to run the following command from a shell console in order to set the right security context:
    chcon -v -t texrel_shlib_t "${PERGEOS_ROOT}"/lib/arch-Linux*-*/lib*.so
  • Even if PerGeos should work with any desktop (like KDE), it has been validated only with GNOME.
  • Since the switch to Qt 5.9 and for CentOS < 7.7 (cat /etc/centos-release to check the version), you need to update the freetype library of your system as follow:
    • Log as root
    • sudo yum update freetype
  •  

XPand

To add custom extensions to PerGeos with PerGeos XPand C++ API on Windows, you will need Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 Update 4. The compiler you need depends on the version of PerGeos you have. You can obtain the version information by typing app uname into the PerGeos console. It is important to install Visual Studio prior to run PerGeos in debug mode.

To add custom extensions to PerGeos with PerGeos XPand C++ API on Linux, you will need gcc 4.8.x on RHEL 7. Use the following command to determine the version of the GNU compiler:
gcc --version

MATLAB

Currently supported version of MATLAB on all platforms is 2020a. To use the Calculus MATLAB module that establishes a connection to MATLAB (MathWorks, Inc.), follow these installation instructions:

Windows

If you did not register during installation, enter the following command on the Windows command line: matlab /regserver.

In addition, add MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin and MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin/win64 in your PATH environment variable to allow PerGeos to find MATLAB libraries.

Linux

The LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable should be set to MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin/glnxa64 on Linux 64-bit.

The PATH environment variable should be also set to MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/bin.
If you still have trouble starting Calculus MATLAB after setting the environment variable, it might be because the GNU Standard C++ Library (libstdc++) installed on your platform is older than the one required by MATLAB. You can check MATLAB's embedded libstdc++ version in MATLAB_INSTALLATION_PATH/sys/os/glnxa64 on Linux 64-bit.

If needed, add this path to LD_LIBRARY_PATH.

Dell Backup and Recovery Application

We have detected some incompatibility issues with former versions ( 1.9) of Dell Backup and Recovery Application which can make PerGeos crash when opening files with the file dialog. Please update your Dell Backup and Recovery Application to 1.9.2.8 or higher if you encounter this issue.

Remote display

PerGeos is not tested in remote sessions; remote display is not supported.

Amira-Avizo2D Software system requirements

Each sub-application (Analyzer, Trainer and Labeler) of Amira-Avizo2D Software have their own system requirements.
The Analyzer and Trainer applications require more processing power than Labeler. For these applications, refer to the respective system requirements documentation below.

Amira-Avizo2D Analyzer

The following recommendations are intended to help you choose a suitable workstation to run the application.

Analyzer runs on Microsoft™ Windows 10 (64-bit). Other than the operating system requirement, the most important components to consider are the graphics card (GPU), the CPU, the RAM, and the hard drive.

The performance of image processing algorithms depends heavily on the performance of the CPU, the GPU, or both. The GPU performance is important for CUDA®-optimized algorithms. Loading or saving large amounts of data depends on the hard drive performance. The amount of system RAM is the main limitation on the size of the data that can be loaded and processed.

Graphic Cards

Analyzer is a 2D application; therefore, it does not require a high-end graphics card for visualization. Any graphics system (GPU+driver) that provides a complete implementation of OpenGL 2.1 or higher is sufficient. However, some algorithms are optimized with a CUDA implementation. The amount of GPU memory required depends mainly on the use of CUDA-optimized algorithms. The minimum recommendation is 1 GB of GPU memory if your sole use of Analyzer is for visualization. For CUDA usage, we highly recommend either 16 or 32 GB of GPU memory. When choosing the graphics card for your workstation, consider whether you require CUDA support. The CUDA technology is available only on NVIDIA graphics cards.

Analyzer does not benefit from multiple graphics boards for visualization on a single monitor. However, some of the image processing algorithms rely on CUDA for computation, and while the computation can run on the single CUDA-enabled graphics card, this computation can also run on a second CUDA-enabled graphics card installed on the system.

System Memory

If you need to process a large amount of data, system memory is an important consideration. At a minimum, you need at least the size of your complete tile set. In practice, you are likely to need much more memory than the actual size of the data being loaded. Some processing can require several times the memory required by the original data set. For example, if you load a 4 GB data set in memory, apply a non-local means filter to it and then compute a distance map, you might need as much as 16 to 20 GB of additional memory for the intermediate results.

Workflow processing occurs separately for each tile of the tile set; therefore, when computation is performed only a single tile is loaded in memory at a time. For a basic workflow, you need, in addition of the size of the input data set, 2 or 3 times the memory footprint of a single tile in the tile set. For a complex workflow, you need up to 6 or 8 times the size of a tile.

Also keep in mind that certain file formats might compress the data so that the disk size of the data is significantly smaller than the memory required to load it.

Hard Drives

When working with large files, reading data from the disk can slow productivity. A standard hard disk drive (for example, a 7200 rpm SATA disk) can only stream data to your application at a sustained rate of about 60 MB/second. That is the theoretical limit; the actual performance is likely to be closer to 40 MB/second. Therefore, reading a 1 GB file from disk typically takes 25 seconds. For a 10 GB file, the wait is over 4 minutes. Compared to traditional HDDs, solid state drives (SSD) can improve read and write speeds.

For best performance, the recommended solution is to configure multiple hard drives (3 or more HDD or SSD) in RAID 5 mode; however, be aware that RAID configurations might require substantially more system administration. For performance only, you could use RAID 0, but at the risk of data loss upon a hard-drive failure. If you want both performance and data redundancy, then RAID 5 is recommended.

CPU

A fast CPU clock, the number of cores, and the memory cache are the most important factors affecting performance. While most multi-threaded modules scale up nicely according to the number of cores, a scaling bottleneck might come from memory access. From experience, up to 8 cores show almost linear scalability while more than 8 cores do not show much gain in performance. A larger memory cache improves performance.

Network

Internet access is necessary to activate the product; however, your firewall might prevent the connection to the license server. For more information, refer to activation documentation. Also be aware that reading data across the network (a file server, for example) is normally much slower than reading from a local disk. The performance of your network depends on the network technology (100 Mb, 1 Gb, etc.), the amount of other traffic on the network, and the number and size of other requests to the file server, so in practice you are unlikely to achieve the theoretical bandwidth.

Amira-Avizo2D Trainer

Trainer runs on Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit).

The following recommendations are intended to help you choose a suitable workstation to run the Trainer application.

Other than the operating system requirement, the most important components to consider for the Trainer application are the graphics card (GPU), and the hard drive. RAM and CPU are used mostly for pre-processing tasks, so the following can be considered sufficient:

  • RAM: at least two times the GPU memory
  • A standard CPU

Graphic Cards

Trainer requires an NVIDIA graphics board that supports CUDA Compute Capability 3.5 or higher. Compatible GPUs can be found here: https://developer.nvidia.com/cuda-gpus.

The minimum amount of dedicated GPU memory is 4 GB. However, deep learning is a compute-intensive task, and performance is directly related to the GPU memory and speed. Therefore, a high-end GPU is recommended, and a recent graphics driver must be installed.

Also note that Trainer does not take advantage of multi-GPU configurations.

Hard Drives

It is recommended to store data on a local fast hard drive (SSD preferred) for quicker data access.

Amira-Avizo2D Labeler

Labeler runs on Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit).

The following recommendations are intended to help you choose a suitable workstation to run the Labeler application.

Graphic Cards

Labeler can run with any graphics card that supports OpenGL 2.1 or higher. A high-end graphics card is not required.

Hard Drives

It is recommended that you store data on a local fast hard drive (SSD preferred) for quicker data access.

 

Services

Amira-Avizo-Introductory-training_1160x600

入门培训

通过专门为 Amira、Avizo 和 PerGeos 软件新用户设计的入门培训,缩短学习曲线,使投资收益最大化。

课程包括一个讲座及互动提问环节。培训材料重点讲述 Amira、Avizo 和 PerGeos 软件的基本特点和功能。

Amira-Avizo-advanced-training_1160x600

高级培训

通过专为 Amira、Avizo 和 PerGeos 软件的现有用户设计的高级培训使投资收益最大化并缩短取得成果的时间。

课程包括一个讲座及互动提问环节。培训材料重点讲述 Amira、Avizo 和 PerGeos 软件的高级特点和功能。

Amira-Avizo-Custom-Dev_1160x600

定制开发

赛默飞世尔科技在 3D 和图像处理方面拥有超过 25 年的经验,向众多小型和大型机构交付了数百个定制项目,可根据您的特定需求为您提供量身定制的解决方案。

我们可以定制和扩展我们不同级别的软件解决方案。

Features

导入和处理您的成像数据

    • 处理任何规模、任何大小及任何模态的数据:

    - 生物数据格式
    - 位图格式
    - 显微镜:电子和光学
    - 医学和神经图像格式
    - 分子格式
    - 其他图像采集设备(MRI、放射摄影术等)

    • 有限元建模、几何建模、CAD
    • 支持多数据/多视图、多通道、时间序列、超大数据
    • 缩放、校准、转换、重新采样
    • 图像增强、能满足各种需求的滤波和卷积、傅立叶变换
    • 伪影消除算法
    • 先进的多模式 2D/3D 自动配准
    • 图像对齐、算术运算、相关、融合

    轻松分割成像数据

    • 阈值和自动分割、对象分离、自动标记
    • 区域生长、活动轮廓、插值、卷绕、平滑
    • 形态学处理,包括分水岭和盆地
    • 基于机器学习的分割
    • 自动追踪单个纤维和丝状体
    • 骨架化和纤丝网络提取
    • 交互式工具,用于生成或编辑分割和空间图形
    • 3D 表面重建
    • FEA/CFD 载网生成

     

    导出您的分析和可视化工作以便无缝发布并演示

    • 动画和视频生成
    • 高级关键帧和物体动画
    • 混合图像、几何模型、测量和模拟
    • 注释、测量图例、柱状图和曲线图
    • 导出电子表格、3D 模型和高质量图像
    • 主动和被动 3D 立体视觉
    • 单屏和多屏显示
    • 沉浸式环境

    可视化和探索您的成像数据

    • 交互式高质量体渲染和多通道可视化
    • 正交、倾斜、圆柱形和弧形切面
    • 轮廓绘制和等值面提取
    • 最大信号或其他类型投影
    • 矢量和张量可视化
    • 对象和追踪
    • 分子可视化

    分析成像数据并获得定量信息

    • 直观的模板菜单创建、自定义、自动重放
    • 内置测量项目,包括计数、体积、面积、周长、长径比和方向
    • 用户定义的测量指标
    • 内含电子表格工具和图表的结果查看器
    • 自动单个特征测量、3D 定位和电子表格选择
    • 自动统计、分布图
    • 使用任何测量标准进行特征过滤
    • 数据配准、变形、比较和测量

     

    轻松、快速地调整 Amira 软件以满足您的特定需求

    • 定制 C++ 模块开发
    • MATLAB™ 桥
    • Python 脚本 API

    Contact us

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